Keeping an eye on Woods and the new top players on the PGA Tour

Spring Horse Racing $400 Instant Bonus Bet | bookmaker.com.au

www.bookmaker.com.au

Get your first deposit matched instantly up to $400 free! Plus split your bonus into 1, 2, 3 or 4 bets and have more chances to win!

Special Racing $100 Free Bet for New Punters | bookmaker.com.au

www.bookmaker.com.au

Deposit $50 and get a $100 bonus bet to use on the Spring Racing Carnival!

 

Graeme McDowell

Graeme McDowell

Talk about a pain in the neck.

Tori Taniguchi’s withdrawal from this week’s World Golf Championships-Accenture Match Play Championship has set up an intriguing first-round matchup at the top of the draw.

England’s Lee Westwood, playing in his first Accenture Match Play as the world’s No. 1-ranked player, now faces former European Ryder Cup teammate Henrik Stenson in a first-round match in the Bobby Jones bracket. Stenson actually has as many PGA TOUR wins as Westwood (two), and they have come in bigger events (the 2007 Match Play and the 2009 PLAYERS Championship).

But Stenson has been colder than someone trying to hit a ball out of the water in his skivvies (which he famously did in the 2009 CA Championship at Doral). Stenson has had just one top-10 finish on the PGA TOUR since 2009 (granted, that was a third at last year’s British Open).

While this may not become the most lopsided first-round matchup since Tiger Woods thumped Stephen Ames 9-and-8 in 2006, it would be a shock to see Westwood lose to a player so out of form.

On the other hand, Westwood has never made it past the second round in his 10 previous starts at Match Play. Here’s a not-so-bold prediction: Stenson will last longer than he did last year, when he quit against Ben Crane after just one hole because of the flu. But not by much.

The focus in Wednesday’s first round also will be on Woods, the three-time Match Play champion trying to end the longest winless drought of his career. Woods faces former British Open runner-up Thomas Bjorn, who won the Qatar Masters earlier this month.

Match Play has long been Woods’ forte — in addition to his three World Match Play titles, he also won the U.S. Junior Amateur and the U.S. Amateur six consecutive years. But this is new ground for Woods as he continues to re-tool his swing while trying to find the form that had him atop the world rankings for more than five years.

If Woods wins, he faces a formidable second-round foe in either two-time Match Play champion Geoff Ogilvy or three-time major winner Padraig Harrington (another cheeky first-round matchup). Woods, in other words, faces a stout challenge to get back into the winner’s circle this week.

In the Sam Snead bracket, Ernie Els, who has usually not fared well in Match Play (he has a fourth and a fifth, but hasn’t made it past the second round his other eight tries) goes against Jeff Overton. Overton has yet to win a PGA TOUR title, but he showed a fiery nature with his “Boom, baby!” shouts at last year’s Ryder Cup. This is a classic matchup of laid-back vs. amped-up.

The other most interesting first-round matchup is when buddies Hunter Mahan and Sean O’Hair square off in the Gary Player bracket. Not only do they share the same coach, Sean Foley, but they also are frequent practice-round partners. O’Hair has the better Match Play record — he’s won his first-round match all three times and was fifth in 2009, while Mahan has never made it past the second round in three tries. But Mahan is hotter, having finished second at Pebble Beach and sixth at Torrey Pines.

Matchups We Would Like To See: Upsets are common place in this event, where a hot putter can carry just about anyone to a victory, so wishing for a matchup is dicey at best. But it would be nice to see these stars line up thusly:

Bubba Watson vs. Dustin Johnson (second round, Snead): ShotLink would get quite a workout between these bombers. This could double as a Long Drive Competition.

Phil Mickelson vs. Rickie Fowler (second round, Ben Hogan): Mickelson gets a look at a younger version of himself. Both play aggressively and have that certain flair for the moment, not to mention they were Ryder Cup teammates.

Alvaro Quiros vs. Ian Poulter (second round, Hogan): These guys should play on runways, not fairways, with their sense of fashion. Both have plenty of substance to go with their style: Poulter is the defending champion and Quiros won at Dubai earlier this month.

Francesco Molinari vs. Edoardo Molinari (quarterfinals, Jones): The brothers from Italy would each have to win their first three matches to meet in the finals of the Jones bracket. The last time Francesco played in a prominent match, he was soundly beaten by Woods in last year’s Ryder Cup.

And the winner is …

Graeme McDowell has been the world’s best golfer since last year’s U.S. Open. The draw could have him facing high-seeded Heath Slocum (No. 15), Ross Fisher (No. 10) and Stewart Cink (No. 14) in the first three rounds. Even if McDowell has to face tougher competition, he has plenty of confidence after claiming the decisive point in last year’s Ryder Cup.

Craig Dolch is a freelance columnist for PGATOUR.COM. His views do not necessarily represent the views of the PGA TOUR.

Horse Racing, Greyhounds, Harness &l Sports Special Betting Offers at bookmaker.com.au

www.bookmaker.com.au

1. Get the winning odds with Best Of The Best, Best Tote or SP, BTote and Fixed Price!

2. Use Quickbet, bypass the standard betslip and get your bets on quicker!

Europe defends Royal Trophy at Black Mountains Golf Club

Spring Horse Racing $400 Instant Bonus Bet | bookmaker.com.au

www.bookmaker.com.au

Get your first deposit matched instantly up to $400 free! Plus split your bonus into 1, 2, 3 or 4 bets and have more chances to win!

Special Racing $100 Free Bet for New Punters | bookmaker.com.au

www.bookmaker.com.au

Deposit $50 and get a $100 bonus bet to use on the Spring Racing Carnival!

Fredrik Andersson and Europe Team

Fredrik Andersson and Europe Team

Europe dominated Sunday’s singles matches to produce an unlikely comeback over Asia and defend its Royal Trophy title with a 9-7 victory at the Black Mountain Golf Club.

Asia needed 2 1/2 points from the eight closing singles matches to clinch the win but the Europeans held them to just one, winning six of the eight matchups with the other two all square.

The Royal Trophy is a five-year-old Ryder Cup-style event matching eight-man teams from Europe and Asia.

Asia had led 6-2 going into the final day after sweeping the fourball matches Saturday.

Peter Hanson of Sweden gave Europe a good start, fighting back from 2 down to win nine of the next 10 holes, beating Liang Wen-chong, 7 and 6.

“It’s been a good day for me,” Hanson said. “Liang’s early birdies really woke me up to play my best. It was always tough to play the first match. And I needed to win my point get some blue up here early to help the rest of the team.”

Rhys Davies of Wales, Fredrik Andersson Hed of Sweden and European playing captain Colin Montgomerie also picked up wins and the series was tied at 6 1/2 after Henrik Stenson of Sweden birdied the last hole to halve his match against Noh Seung-yul of South Korea.

Italian 17-year-old Matteo Manassero then put Europe in the lead for the first time by beating Shunsuke Sonoda of Japan 1 up, but it still looked like Jeev Milkha Singh of India and Thongchai Jaidee of Thailand might rescue the situation for Asia.

Singh was all square with Pablo Martin of Spain after 17 holes, while Thongchai was one up over Johan Edfors of Sweden going to the 18th.

But a superb approach shot from Martin landed only 18 inches from the pin on the 18th green, and after Singh missed his birdie putt, the Spaniard made an easy tap-in to clinch the victory for Europe. Edfors then won the last hole to halve his match with Thongchai.

“With the score we had by Saturday, I … didn’t expect to lose,” Asia Captain Joe Ozaki said. “But I realized the difficulty of match play. It could change very fast.”

Davies was making his debut for Europe and said he can’t wait for another opportunity.

“I love team golf,” he said. “I played quite a bit as an amateur, (but) this is my first experience as a professional and I thoroughly enjoyed it, just really pushing hard for our team.”

Enhanced by Zemanta

Horse Racing, Greyhounds, Harness &l Sports Special Betting Offers at bookmaker.com.au

www.bookmaker.com.au

1. Get the winning odds with Best Of The Best, Best Tote or SP, BTote and Fixed Price!

2. Use Quickbet, bypass the standard betslip and get your bets on quicker!

Reviewing a true Champions history

Spring Horse Racing $400 Instant Bonus Bet | bookmaker.com.au

www.bookmaker.com.au

Get your first deposit matched instantly up to $400 free! Plus split your bonus into 1, 2, 3 or 4 bets and have more chances to win!

Special Racing $100 Free Bet for New Punters | bookmaker.com.au

www.bookmaker.com.au

Deposit $50 and get a $100 bonus bet to use on the Spring Racing Carnival!

palmer-arnold-thumbsup

Arnold Palmer

Framed photographs large and small hang in every room and adorn the walls of every corridor inside the Bay Hill Club & Lodge, memories of Arnold Palmer and more than a half-century he devoted to golf.

He is flinging his visor after winning the Masters. He is posing with one of his best friends, 1958 PGA Champion Dow Finsterwald, and his longtime rival, Jack Nicklaus. In one picture, he is wearing a Chinese hat during his first trip to China to design a golf course.

Unmistakable in nearly every photograph is a smile.

In his design company office one day in December, he was asked why he was always seemed happy.

“I loved what I was doing,” he said. “I got to play a great game. I have a great life, a great family, all the things you could want. I love the feeling of getting out of bed each morning.”

Golf featured its share of unpleasant moments this year — Tiger Woods, leaning back against his locker at Sawgrass with his eyes closed after pulling out of The Players Championship, perhaps the low point on the golf course in a year filled with them; Dustin Johnson, erasing his scorecard to change a 5 to a 7 after being told he was in a bunker on the last hole of the PGA Championship; Paul Casey, facing reporters who wanted answers he didn’t have as to why he was left off the Ryder Cup team.

The photos of Palmer are a reminder that it’s a great game, and a great life. As always, there were plenty of poignant moments from a year on the PGA Tour that go beyond birdies and bogeys and bunkers:

–Lee Westwood shot 68 in the final round of the Honda Classic, and when he signed his card, he was in a seven-way tie for 15th.

He retreated to the bar with his agent, Chubby Chandler, and watched the follies unfold as one player after another dropped shots coming in at PGA National. When it was over, Westwood was in a three-way tie for ninth, the difference of about $87,000.

“The best drink we’ve ever had,” Chandler said.

–Paul Goydos didn’t want to wait for officials to stop play, not when he was facing a tough tee shot on the 11th hole at Riviera in a cold rain that was starting to come down sideways.

That’s when he declared that the tee box was in casual water and someone would have to call for the maintenance crew. He figured that would take enough time for the tour to decide to suspend play. What he didn’t realize was the maintenance shed was right behind him.

In less than a minute, three workers arrived carrying squeegees.

Goydos was startled, finally breaking the silence by saying under his breath, “Well, that didn’t work out too well.”

Play on.

–Tiger Woods was in the second-to-last group at the U.S. Open, five shots behind Dustin Johnson. He was playing with Gregory Havret. The final group was Johnson and Graeme McDowell, none having ever contended in a major.

Before leaving the putting green and walking up the steps to the first tee, Woods hit a 50-foot lag putt toward the hole at the far edge of the green. He left it 5 feet short, then settled over that putt.

He missed. Woods reached with his putter to bring the ball back to him, stood over it, and missed it again. He pulled the ball back and missed a third time, then missed a fourth time. With that, he handed the putter to his caddie and headed to the tee.

On the first hole, he three-putted for bogey. Within an hour, his U.S. Open hopes were gone.

–Phil Mickelson walked off the 10th tee at St. Andrews during a practice round and saw the concession stands. His eyes lit up, not just because he was hungry, but it was an opportunity for one of his favorite treats. Mickelson is known to walk up to a food stand at tournaments and announce he’s buying for everyone in line.

He took his wallet from his bag and told his caddie and coach he would be with them in a few minutes. It didn’t take long for Mickelson to rejoin them, however, and he wasn’t happy.

It was Sunday. The concession stand was closed.

–One of the most entertaining nights of the year is when European Tour caddies are feted — and roasted — at the HSBC Champions. Fanny Sunesson won an award for “misclub of the year.”

Turns out her boss, Henrik Stenson, hit a 3-wood on the 18th hole at Dubai that not only failed to clear the large pond fronting the green, it barely made it to the water.

For her honor, Sunesson won two bottles of fine wine. Stenson, with mock anger, marched onto the stage and took one of the bottles before returning to his seat. He came back on stage as Sunesson explained what happened.

It dates to the previous year at the Masters, when Stenson wanted to hit 3-wood for his second shot on the 15th. Knowing that the Swede tends to hit his 3-wood low and hard, she reminded him he would have to hit a high, soft cut. Stenson instead drilled it over the green, almost into the water behind the green.

“So we get to Dubai and he wants to hit 3-wood to the green,” Sunesson explains. “Now this was the right shot for his 3-wood. And tell them what you did, Henrik.”

Stenson, slowly bowed his head and leaned toward the microphone.

“Soft cut,” he said.

–After the third round of the HSBC Champions in Shanghai, some 200 fans stood behind the railing outside the clubhouse after Woods walked by to sign his card. One man in the middle of the pack led a chant in Chinese that, based on the cadence, most likely was, “We want Tiger! We want Tiger!” This went on for a few minutes until a lone voice in broken English called out, “Tiger, where are you?”

The chant started again, but he had left through a back door to meet with sponsors.

A month later during the pro-am at the Chevron World Challenge, Woods had to walk along a cart path toward the 13th fairway. Three times, he stopped and posed for pictures with fans, something he has never done.

Something old, something new.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Horse Racing, Greyhounds, Harness &l Sports Special Betting Offers at bookmaker.com.au

www.bookmaker.com.au

1. Get the winning odds with Best Of The Best, Best Tote or SP, BTote and Fixed Price!

2. Use Quickbet, bypass the standard betslip and get your bets on quicker!

European Challenge Tour gets new sponsor for The Princess

Spring Horse Racing $400 Instant Bonus Bet | bookmaker.com.au

www.bookmaker.com.au

Get your first deposit matched instantly up to $400 free! Plus split your bonus into 1, 2, 3 or 4 bets and have more chances to win!

Special Racing $100 Free Bet for New Punters | bookmaker.com.au

www.bookmaker.com.au

Deposit $50 and get a $100 bonus bet to use on the Spring Racing Carnival!

SchucosponsorsThePrincess

Schuco sponsors The Princess

German Engineering firm Schüco International KG has been named as the title sponsor of The Princess, the European Challenge Tour event supported by Swedish Ryder Cup star Henrik Stenson.

The Princess by Schüco, now in its third year, will be played from June 30-July 3, 2011, at a new venue, PGA of Sweden National in Bara, near Malmö, Sweden.

Schüco, which is based in Bielefeld, Germany, and has a staff of 5,000 and 12,000 partners in more than 75 countries, is one of Stenson’s main sponsors. The firm provides a broad product portfolio with customised solutions and top quality materials which meet the highest standards of energy efficiency and convenience design, from state-of-the-art window and facade technology all the way to sustainable solar solutions.

Through its brand statement “saving energy and generating energy”, Schüco is committed to providing solutions to the challenges posed by climate change.

Stenson, who will round off the week by teeing up against a world-class opponent in The Princess Charity Challenge, said: “Being a father of two and a product of the Challenge Tour, it is with the utmost satisfaction that I can see the event develop and progress. I am very happy that a company such as Schüco recognises the efforts made by The Princess to encourage young professionals and juniors develop as golfers, as well as individuals. A sustainable future that we all can partake in and play golf in is a common ambition. The Princess and Schüco are not only here to stay, but are also willing to assume greater responsibility in making our future a brighter and better one.”

Dirk U. Hindrichs, President and CEO of Schüco International KG, said: “We are proud to be the presenting sponsor of The Princess. We are all about the future – a sustainable future.

“Our technology is developed to ensure comfort, without sacrificing any of our scarce natural resources. The Princess is all about investing in the future too, in the next generation as well as the ones to follow. In golf, we see a game played outdoors in harmony with nature, we see precision and technology applied in a gentlemanly manner to achieve seemingly effortless power.

“Henrik Stenson aspires to inspire future generations to find their place in the world through the game of golf, and other sports. In his work with his Foundation and through other initiatives, he clearly displays the same passion we share about investing in our future.”

Alain de Soultrait, Director of the Challenge Tour, said: “An already strong tournament has become even stronger with the announcement of Schüco as title sponsors. With the support of Henrik Stenson, who won the Challenge Tour Rankings in 2000, and now a well-respected company such as Schüco on board, The Princess has a very bright future. The Challenge Tour shares the same vision of investing in the future, so our partnership with Schüco is a natural fit.”

Schüco joins an already-impressive roster of partners who will be supporting the event: SGF, Hugo Boss and PEAB and PGA of Sweden National Resort. In addition to supporting the Henrik Stenson Foundation, the event will also raise funds for its chosen charity, the World Childhood Foundation and Friends.

SchucosponsorsThePrincess

Schuco sponsors The Princess

Enhanced by Zemanta

Horse Racing, Greyhounds, Harness &l Sports Special Betting Offers at bookmaker.com.au

www.bookmaker.com.au

1. Get the winning odds with Best Of The Best, Best Tote or SP, BTote and Fixed Price!

2. Use Quickbet, bypass the standard betslip and get your bets on quicker!

Furyk has his FedEx Cup but where did your player make out for the year in earnings and are they safe?

Spring Horse Racing $400 Instant Bonus Bet | bookmaker.com.au

www.bookmaker.com.au

Get your first deposit matched instantly up to $400 free! Plus split your bonus into 1, 2, 3 or 4 bets and have more chances to win!

Special Racing $100 Free Bet for New Punters | bookmaker.com.au

www.bookmaker.com.au

Deposit $50 and get a $100 bonus bet to use on the Spring Racing Carnival!

furyk and fedex cup

Jim Furyk and FedEx Cup

My first feature for PGATOUR.COM was a preseason, full-membership fantasy rankings for 2010. (This included all golfers through the conditional status priority ranking, No. 27, and non-members inside the top 50 of the world ranking through Dec. 31, 2009.)

It had columns for salary leaguers and relevant comments for most. With the season now complete, here’s a peek back at how each golfer fared. Notable stats, facts and new comments are included for all 241 golfers. Note that PUSH means the player made less or more than 10 percent of his 2009 earnings.

LEGEND
PUSH = ±10 percent of 2009 earnings
NT = Nationwide Tour
QS = Q School
CM = Conditional Member
MME = Major Medical Extension
MiME = Minor Medical Extension
NM = Non-Member

BOLTON’S RANKINGS REVISITED: 1-50 | 51-100 | 101-150 | 151-200 | 201-240 | Preseason projections
Bolton’s projections revisited
Nos. 1-50
Rank     Golfer     Salary projection     Actual result     Comment
-     Tiger Woods     MINUS     MINUS     Totaled just over 12 percent of his 2009 earnings.
1     Phil Mickelson     PLUS     MINUS     Despite Masters victory, failed to sustain form with which he ended 2009.
2     Zach Johnson     PUSH     MINUS     Slow start was fueled by uncharacteristically below average short game.
3     Geoff Ogilvy     PUSH     MINUS     Supported hired-gun strategy, banking over 70 percent of his earnings in two starts (SBS, Deutsche Bank).
4     Padraig Harrington     PLUS     MINUS     One of the year’s biggest disappointments. Aggregate earnings of 2009 and 2010 still $300K short of 2008.
5     Steve Stricker     MINUS     MINUS     Performed exactly as expected. Dropped over $2 million in earnings, but still made $4.1M.
6     Jim Furyk     PUSH     PLUS     With nearly $4 million in 2009, he was still a safe play this season, but not as valuable despite three wins. Not slowing down.
7     Hunter Mahan     PUSH     PLUS     First multiple-win season, but just three top 10s total. Career-high in earnings ($3.57M) and final money list rank (10th).
8     Henrik Stenson     PLUS     MINUS     Fail. First top 25 of the year on the PGA TOUR was a T3 at the British. Then battled virus. Didn’t qualify for FedExCup Playoffs.
9     Dustin Johnson     PUSH     PLUS     Earned $4.47 million and finished fourth on the money list despite coming up short at the U.S. Open and PGA Championship. Won twice.
10     Sean O’Hair     MINUS     MINUS     Fell over $2.45 million in earnings, which isn’t surprising given his continued struggles on the green.
11     David Toms     PUSH     MINUS     His $3-million season in 2009 seemed like a return to the norm, but now it looks like the anomaly. Finished 49th in earnings in 2010, second-worst in 12 years.
12     Nick Watney     MINUS     MINUS     Eight top 10s and 15 top 25s were career highs, but zero wins, places or shows.
13     Kevin Na     PLUS     MINUS     Made more news with his attitude than his second consecutive year over $2 million in earnings.
14     Retief Goosen     MINUS     PUSH     Ten top 10s was a career high. Finished under $15K short of his earnings in 2009.
15     Stewart Cink     PUSH     MINUS     Three top 10s fewest since joining PGA TOUR. At 52nd on the money list, just the second time he’s finished outside the top 45 (73rd, 2002).
16     Anthony Kim     PLUS     PLUS     Fueled by a win, one solo second and one solo third through the Masters, amassed over $2.5 million in just 14 starts. Had surgery on his left thumb in May, forcing him out three months.
17     Justin Leonard     PUSH     MINUS     Banked less than 50 percent of his earnings from 2009. First season since joining the PGA TOUR with just one top 10. Hit two percent fewer greens in regulation, falling 111 spots in the ranking.
18     Mike Weir     PUSH     MINUS     Lone top 10 occurred in his first event (solo sixth, Bob Hope). Didn’t qualify for FedExCup Playoffs, and then called it a season with a torn ligament in his right elbow.
19     Luke Donald     PUSH     PLUS     Career high in earnings with over $3.66 million — zero wins, but five top threes. Led TOUR in sand saves second consecutive year.
20     Adam Scott     PLUS     PLUS     Tripled earnings over 2009, with nearly $2.49 million. Returned to winner’s circle on PGA TOUR at TPC San Antonio’s AT&T Oaks Course designed by his golf hero, Greg Norman.
21     Ernie Els     PLUS     PLUS     Doubled 2009 earnings and then some, finishing third on the money list with over $4.55 million (hadn’t finished higher than 20th in five seasons). Consecutive wins in March garnered early Player of the Year chatter.
22     Tim Clark     PUSH     PLUS     Notched first TOUR victory at THE PLAYERS. Set career highs in earnings ($3.53M), top 10s (seven) and final money list ranking (11th).
23     Lucas Glover     MINUS     MINUS     Finished 57th in earnings with over $1.5 million, so it was a predictably average year. Winless since the 2009 U.S. Open.
24     Ryan Moore     PLUS     PUSH     Banked nearly seven percent more in earnings (career-high $2.37M) over 2009 without the benefit of a victory. Continues to pour on the cool on TOUR and in your lineup.
25     Rory Sabbatini     MINUS     MINUS     Standard effort without a victory, with over $1.5 million and three top 10s. This is about as bad as he gets, and that’s a good thing.
26     Steve Marino     PLUS     MINUS     Sputtered despite three top 10s and 10 top 25s. Was shorter off the tee, less accurate into the green and required more putts compared to 2009.
27     Sergio Garcia     PUSH     MINUS     Top-of-the-year concern over sore right wrist was overstated, and he cashed in 13 of 15 starts, but couldn’t shake mental demons. Took a sabbatical for two months before October return in Europe.
28     Chad Campbell     PLUS     MINUS     Failed to crack seven figures in earnings for first time since rookie year of 2002. First season as a TOUR member without a top-three finish.
29     Robert Allenby     PUSH     PLUS     Earned over $2.97 million, second-highest of his career (2008). Recommitment to putting helped pave the way.
30     Kenny Perry     MINUS     MINUS     You saw this coming. Made just 20 starts (fewest since 2000) after easing into his season due to elbow tendinitis. Turned 50 in August. Didn’t play PGA TOUR after The Barclays.
31     Charles Howell III     PUSH     MINUS     In 28 starts, had six top 10s and 11 top 25s. Tenth consecutive season with at least $1.4 million. Sandwiched forgettable midseason with hot start and finish.
32     Scott Verplank     PUSH     MINUS     Earned over 61 percent of his money with three top fives in four starts in May and June, his only top 10s of the year. Hit 3.15 percent fewer greens over 2009, falling 121 spots in the GIR ranking.
33     Ian Poulter     PUSH     MINUS     Despite PGA TOUR breakthrough at the Match Play (worth $1.4M), still barely cracked $2 million. Kept with trend and made minimum 15 starts in the third consecutive Ryder Cup year.
34     Brandt Snedeker     PLUS     PUSH     Cleared $1.6 million (up eight percent from 2009) and led the TOUR in putting (1.710), but ranked 182nd in greens hit. New grooves didn’t hamper his touch around the greens.
35     Camilo Villegas     PUSH     PLUS     Less is more. Made just 20 starts, fewest in five years on TOUR, but his $3.035 million is his second-best haul. Seven top 10s ties a career high.
36     Rory McIlroy     PUSH     PLUS     Rookie tripled his non-member earnings from 2009, finishing 26th on the money list with over $2.55M. Carded candidate for round of the year with closing 62 to win (by four) at Quail Hollow.
37     Stuart Appleby     PLUS     PLUS     Road warrior fulfilled my projection as a steal in the draft, banking nearly 3.5 times his 2009 earnings. Won The Greenbrier Classic in what was his 11th of 13 consecutive starts in the summer.
38     Vijay Singh     PLUS     PUSH     Balky back derailed a resurgence of form in March. It took three months for a return of consistent good play. Still managed 24 starts, but two top 10s was a career low.
39     Brian Gay     MINUS     MINUS     As projected, he took a tumble, netting less than half his earnings from 2009, with just over $1.5 million. In 30 starts, had his average 10 top 25s, but just two top 10s.
40     John Senden     MINUS     MINUS     Recorded both top 10s and 62.5 percent of his earnings in the FedExCup Playoffs and Fall Series. Led TOUR in greens in regulation (72.49 percent) for second consecutive year.
41     Lee Westwood     NM     –     With nearly $3.4 million, more than tripled his non-member salary over 2009. Won for the second time on the PGA TOUR, and posted a pair of solo seconds in majors.
42     Davis Love III     PUSH     MINUS     Curtailed schedule a bit, making just 24 starts (down from 27). A T6 at the U.S. Open was his first top 10 in a major since the 2005 PGA. Ranked an impressively surprising fourth in ball-striking.
43     Jerry Kelly     MINUS     MINUS     Earnings of $1.136 million is lowest since 2000. Had six top-15 paydays, but just one top 10. Cashed in all five events in the Fall Series.
44     Mark Wilson     PUSH     MINUS     Snuck into the top 125 with a solo sixth at the finale, just his second top 10 of the year. Earnings of $789K first sub-$1.5M since 2006.
45     K.J. Choi     PLUS     PLUS     Relevant again. No-brainer rebound, with well more than double his 2009 earnings. Missed just three cuts in 22 starts (down from nine in ’09).
46     Y.E. Yang     MINUS     MINUS     Shook off any fatigue from his offseason whirlwind of a schedule, with four top 25s on the West Coast Swing. Would only total six through the Memorial. Disappeared in the second half.
47     Heath Slocum     MINUS     PUSH     Best season of nine on TOUR, with nearly $2.39 million and just two missed cuts (in 25 starts). Finished 30th in earnings for the second time (2007). Won inaugural McGladrey Classic.
48     Angel Cabrera     MINUS     MINUS     Thanks to a career-high 19 starts, his $1.266M is a personal best without a victory. Still as inconsistent as he is deadly in any given week.
49     Ben Curtis     PLUS     PUSH     At 120th, his fifth year (of eight) outside the top 100. Remains one of the best investments you never make.
50     Paul Casey     MINUS     PLUS     Rib muscle injury guided my projection, but he wound up having a career high in earnings ($3.6 million) and without the benefit of a victory. Second consecutive runner-up at the WGC-Match Play.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Horse Racing, Greyhounds, Harness &l Sports Special Betting Offers at bookmaker.com.au

www.bookmaker.com.au

1. Get the winning odds with Best Of The Best, Best Tote or SP, BTote and Fixed Price!

2. Use Quickbet, bypass the standard betslip and get your bets on quicker!